The Latest

Jul 29, 2014
Jul 28, 2014 / 7 notes
aabany-group:

A story that has never been told, Chinese American Exclusion/Inclusion illustrates the often overlooked Chinese experience at the heart of American history. The New York Historical Society’s landmark exhibition will be on from September 26th until May 2015. This exhibit highlights the lives, achievements, culture, struggles, and diversity of Chinese Americans from the 18th century to today.
Please help the New York Historical Society in conveying the richness of our lived experiences. The Many Faces page on the exhibit’s website offers an opportunity for Chinese Americans to tell their own stories. The New York Chinese-American community is invited to share a story and photo. Submissions may be featured in the exhibit or online. Click here to share your story. 
Jul 28, 2014 / 534 notes

aabany-group:

A story that has never been told, Chinese American Exclusion/Inclusion illustrates the often overlooked Chinese experience at the heart of American history. The New York Historical Society’s landmark exhibition will be on from September 26th until May 2015. This exhibit highlights the lives, achievements, culture, struggles, and diversity of Chinese Americans from the 18th century to today.

Please help the New York Historical Society in conveying the richness of our lived experiences. The Many Faces page on the exhibit’s website offers an opportunity for Chinese Americans to tell their own stories. The New York Chinese-American community is invited to share a story and photo. Submissions may be featured in the exhibit or online. Click here to share your story. 

(via noface-nameless)

Jul 28, 2014 / 77,573 notes

disneyvillainsforjustice:

-teesa-:

7.23.14

George Takei describes the moment when he and his family were sent to an internment camp.

"Another scene I remember now as an adult is every morning at school we started the day with the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag…there was the American flag flying over the camp but I could also see the barbed wire fence and the sentry towers pointing at us from my schoolhouse window as I recited the words ‘With liberty and justice for all’." - George Takei, The Daily Show (July 24, 2014). 

Full Episode (apologies, The Daily Show website does not have the best video player). 

To Be Takei documentary official website. 

- Mod Dawes Sr. 

(via noface-nameless)

Jul 28, 2014 / 1 note
Jul 27, 2014 / 205,947 notes

moarrrmagazine:

Dazzling artwork with flowers by Limzy

(via baritonepats)

teachingliteracy:

“Hollywood has this psychology—there’s this whole plantation mentality where it’s all about power and someone trying to impose their values on you. It’s nuts, they’ll tell you how to tell stories about people they never really came into contact with. Executives, story readers, development executives don’t interact with people other than their kind so how would they know what’s acceptable to people of color? It is not about and never has been about supplying a diverse look at life. It is all from and for a white audience. And because of that fact this group of people who determines what the world sees have no idea, not a clue as to reality. It is a product of arrogance and power. Input from you is viewed as a personal attack. If you try to go beyond stereotypes and reflect real people who share the same concerns as everyone else, you’re told that your characters aren’t “black” enough, or to use more curse words because the language isn’t “real” enough. You have to have drugs and gangsters. Some person who saw To Sleep With Anger said, “I didn’t know that black people had washing machines!” Where did they get that notion? Well, it was an honest observation in a way because Hollywood shows us poor and grimy without any means of support except if you are a rapper or prostitute or selling drugs. They have this notion of what films should be, and what the realities of your environment are, and if you come up with what is real, that becomes unreal to them, in a sense. It’s important to tell your own story, and when you see other people telling your story, and [when] someone denies you your reality, and is telling you what your family and your grandmother are like—how outrageous can it get? You have to be able to tell your stories and share them with the rest of the world. How else are things supposed to change?”
- Charles Burnett
Jul 27, 2014 / 223 notes

teachingliteracy:

“Hollywood has this psychology—there’s this whole plantation mentality where it’s all about power and someone trying to impose their values on you. It’s nuts, they’ll tell you how to tell stories about people they never really came into contact with. Executives, story readers, development executives don’t interact with people other than their kind so how would they know what’s acceptable to people of color? It is not about and never has been about supplying a diverse look at life. It is all from and for a white audience. And because of that fact this group of people who determines what the world sees have no idea, not a clue as to reality. It is a product of arrogance and power. Input from you is viewed as a personal attack. If you try to go beyond stereotypes and reflect real people who share the same concerns as everyone else, you’re told that your characters aren’t “black” enough, or to use more curse words because the language isn’t “real” enough. You have to have drugs and gangsters. Some person who saw To Sleep With Anger said, “I didn’t know that black people had washing machines!” Where did they get that notion? Well, it was an honest observation in a way because Hollywood shows us poor and grimy without any means of support except if you are a rapper or prostitute or selling drugs. They have this notion of what films should be, and what the realities of your environment are, and if you come up with what is real, that becomes unreal to them, in a sense. It’s important to tell your own story, and when you see other people telling your story, and [when] someone denies you your reality, and is telling you what your family and your grandmother are like—how outrageous can it get? You have to be able to tell your stories and share them with the rest of the world. How else are things supposed to change?”

- Charles Burnett

(via meanarose)

Jul 27, 2014 / 95 notes
ahealthblog:

Love Handles Yoga Sequence
Jul 27, 2014 / 26 notes
Jul 27, 2014 / 517 notes

landscapelifescape:

Tham Lod Cave in the Mae Hong Son Wilderness, Northern Thailand 

 by DrewHopper 

(via southeastasianists)